Data Science

Random Forest – The Evergreen Classifier

DisclaimerSome of the terms used in this article may seem too advanced for an absolute novice in the fields of machine learning or statistic. I have tried to include supplementary resources as links which can be used for better understanding. All in all I hope that this article motivates you to try solving a problem of your own with random forest.

In the last few weeks I have been working on some classification problems involving multiple classes. My first approach after cleaning the data-set and pre-processing it for categorical outputs was to go with the simplest classification algorithm that I knew – Logistic Regression. The logistic regression is a very simple classifier that uses the sigmoid function output to classify the labels. It is very well suited to a binary classification problem in which there are only two possible outcomes. However, it can also be tweaked to classify multiple classes by using one-vs-one or one-vs-all approaches. Similar approaches can be taken with Support Vector Machine as well. The accuracy I got was around 88% in the training set and about 89% on my cross-validation set after a few hours of parameter tuning. This was good but as I researched more, I came across Decision Trees and their bootstrapped aggregated version, Random Forest. A few minutes into the algorithm’s documentation (by the person who coined the term bagging, Prof Breiman), I was amazed by its robustness and functionality. It was like an all in one algorithm for Classification, Regression, Clustering and even filling the missing values in the data-set. No other machine learning algorithm caught my attention as much as it did. In this article I would try to explain the working of the algorithm and its features which make it an evergreen algorithm.

A random forest works by creating multiple classification trees. Each tree is grown as follows:

  1. If the number of cases in the training set is N, sample N cases at random – but with replacement, from the original data. This sample will be the training set for growing the tree.
  2. If there are M input variables, a number m<<M is specified such that at each node, m variables are selected at random out of the M and the best split on these m is used to split the node. The value of m is held constant during the forest growing.
  3. Each tree is grown to the largest extent possible. There is no pruning.

To classify a new object from an input vector, put the input vector down each of the trees in the forest. Each tree gives a classification, and we say the tree “votes” for that class. The forest chooses the classification having the most votes (over all the trees in the forest).

One of the great features of this is that it eliminates the need for a cross-validation set, since each tree is constructed using a different bootstrap sample from the original data. About one-third of the cases are left out of the bootstrap sample and not used in the construction of the kth tree.

The algorithm also gives you an idea about the importance of various features in the data-set. As this article mentions, “In every tree grown in the forest, put down the out-of-bag cases and count the number of votes cast for the correct class. Now randomly permute the values of variable m in the out-of-bag cases and put these cases down the tree. Subtract the number of votes for the correct class in the variable-m-permuted out-of-bag data from the number of votes for the correct class in the untouched out-of-bag data. The average of this number over all trees in the forest is the raw importance score for variable m.”

Do check out the page by Berkeley to get more idea about the great points about the algorithm like:

  • Outlier Detection
  • Proximity Measure
  • Missing Value replacement for training and test sets
  • Scaling
  • Modelling for quantitative outputs, etc and more

But, one thing is undisputed, Random forest is among the most powerful algorithms that are out there for classification, and there are off the shelf versions that can be used for many typical problems.

As a last note, do check out the photo-gallery of Prof. Breiman to get a more idea about his life and his work. I could not help but feel motivated after going through his work.

Advertisements

Found a few amazing blogs for R and Data Science enthusiasts

Today I had a bit of free time and since I had not opened up my R console in a really long long time, I decided to try a few of the scripts that could do something interesting. Going through my R-bloggers mails, I found quite a few interesting posts. I thought of putting these here so that I don’t lose them. Hope you enjoy it too. 🙂